Cloud9 win first LCS Finals title in 6 years

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To close out the 2020 Spring Split LCS Finals, Cloud9 sweeped FlyQuest 3–0. Cloud9’s 2020 LCS win is a great accomplishment, especially after getting second place six times.

Before the split started, Cloud9 dropped Summer Split MVP Dennis “Svenskeren” Johnsen for their academy jungler, Robert “Blaber” Huang. After sending away their support Tristan “Zeyzal” Stidam, they picked up Philippe “Vulcan” Laflamme in a $1.5 million buyout.

These roster moves would have caused a bigger upset had Cloud9 not shocked their fanbase by dropping Zachary “Sneaky” Scuderi. He was, after all, the last remaining member from their famous 2013 to 2014 roster. The now oldest team member Eric “Licorice” Ritchie has only been on Cloud9 since the postseason of 2017. Fans were angry with Cloud9 management and had no idea what to expect from the brand new roster.

LCS Finals

Image credit to Riot Games

Game 1 of the 2020 LCS Finals started with FlyQuest trading blows with Cloud9. The new Cloud9 roster barely came out ahead of each skirmish. Bloodbaths continued until 27 minutes when FlyQuest lost a fight. Cloud9 then secured Baron Nashor to take a deciding advantage and eventually pushed their victory with an Ocean Soul. The game ended in 39 minutes with a 21–13 kill lead by Cloud9.

In Game 2, Cloud9 opted for an early aggressive strategy against FlyQuest’s defensive scaling. FlyQuest’s game started out well but the opposition quickly took the lead. At 12 minutes, Cloud9 accumulated a 7–2 kill score and two elemental dragons. Their domination led to an early Baron buff at 21 minutes, securing their lead. Cloud9 then secured the Ocean Soul, closing out the game in just 30 minutes with a kill score of 24–6.

In the final round, FlyQuest refused to go down easily. They kept the kill count even for 15 minutes at a 4–4 score. But Cloud9’s superior skill and teamwork proved to be too much for them. FlyQuest lost a 5 vs. 4 fight around an 18 minute Mountain Drake. From there, Cloud9 secured Baron Nashor at 20 minutes. To guarantee their championship title, Cloud9 slowed the game down until Mountain Soul presented itself. Then with their lead, they easily secured it and made history at 28 minutes with a 16–7 kill score.

Nothing this season went as expected. Team Liquid, the four-time concurrent champions of North America, placed ninth after making a supposed roster upgrade. Team SoloMid, a historic team that’s had a rough couple years but were expected to contend Cloud9 for the title, failed to show up and were eliminated by FlyQuest in the earlier rounds of LCS Playoffs. FlyQuest themselves sat at the bottom of the standings in the earlier weeks of the 2020 Spring Split. But it was Cloud9, the team that had placed second six times in six years, that was finally able to secure the 2020 LCS Finals and make history as one of North America’s most dominant teams.

Written by Devon Huge

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